HPC MSU

Publication Abstract

A Historical Review of the Development of Verification and Validation Theories for Simulation Models

Durst, P., Anderson, D., & Bethel, C. L. (2017). A Historical Review of the Development of Verification and Validation Theories for Simulation Models. International Journal of Modeling, Simulation, and Scientific Computing. 8(2), 1-24. DOI:10.1142/S1793962317300011.

Abstract

Modeling and simulation (M&S) play a critical role in both engineering and basic research processes. Computer-based models have existed since the 1950s, and those early models have given way to the more complex computational and physics-based simulations used today. As such, a great deal of research has been done to establish what level of trust should be given to simulation outputs and how to verify and validate the models used in these simulations. This paper presents an overview of the theoretical work done to date defining formal definitions for, and methods of, verification and validation (V&V) of computer models. Simulation models are broken down into three broad categories: analytical and simulation models, computational and physics-based models, and simulations of autonomous systems, and the unique theories and methods developed to address V&V of these models are presented. This paper also presents the current problems in the theoretical field of V&V for models as simulations move from single system models and simulations to more complex simulation tools. In particular, this paper highlights the lack of agreed-upon methods for V&V of simulations of autonomous systems, such as an autonomous unmanned vehicles, and proposes some next steps needed to address this problem. Read More: http://www.worldscientific.com/doi/abs/10.1142/S1793962317300011