HPC MSU

Publication Abstract

Integrated Computational Materials Engineering (ICME) for Metals: Reinvigorating Engineering Design with Science

Horstemeyer, M. (2012). Integrated Computational Materials Engineering (ICME) for Metals: Reinvigorating Engineering Design with Science. Integrated Computational Materials Engineering (ICME) for Metals: Reinvigorating Engineering Design with Science ISBN: 978-1-118-02252-8. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley Press.

Abstract

This book by Dr. Mark F. Horstemeyer lays the foundations to develop the field of computational materials science further into a robust simulation-based design strategy for understanding, improving, and optimizing materials, parts, and engineering structures. The great progress that is inherent in this novel Integrated Computational Materials Engineering (ICME) approach is its practical perspective toward solving engineering design tasks in a holistic way by combining exact ab initio simulations with finite element analysis of complex microstructures and failure prediction. These three columns of the author’s novel hierarchical approach are the essence of modern computational materials engineering. First, ab initio simulations can provide exact intrinsic thermodynamic and structure information that cannot be obtained by any other theory. This part of the approach follows the tenet that simulations should be as simple as possible but not simpler. Second, such generic first-principle predictions enter into mesoscopic models that capture the interaction of the different phases and defects. This modeling level is essential as modern engineering materials are often characterized by complex multiphase, multidefect, and multimechanism microstructures. Third, these microstructure models are combined with adequate structure–property relationships, placing particular attention on defect initiation and growth. This is essential as reliable failure prediction is one the main ultimate goals in structural design. In real engineering parts, it is particularly the lifetime that matters for final products such as engines, planes structures, or power plant structures.