Gordon Conference Posters


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Sundays, July 13:
Evening:
Should address extrapolation of existing technologies, bottlenecks, integration of memory hierarchy and interconnection networks, and programmability. Novel techniques for achieving low critical instruction path from program to program are encouraged.

Monday, July 14:
Morning:
Should address any areas of new, high performance and capable network protocols, particularly those that provide simultaneous quality of service and capabilities, shorten critical paths between user programs, and utilize computation hierarchies.
Evening:
Should address revolutionary opportunities opened by use of real-time concepts to address practical applications, whether or not the application itself has any real-time requirements. Why isn't time and timeliness more central to high performance computing and information infrastructure?

Tuesday, July 15:
Morning:
Should discuss key opportunities involving two and more levels of computation hierarchy, including protection, separation of concerns, performance, asynchrony, scalability, and cost-effectiveness. Such systems may not be realizable for 5-10 years.
Evening:
Should show opportunities, challenges, and schema for using processors in memory in far future systems, and what this will imply for software systems that depend on such mechanisms.

Wednesday, July 16:
Should consider issues of latency and bandwidth on applications, including memory hierarchy issues, prefetching, post-storing, and the need for tertiary bandwidth as well (disk). The speeding up of processors far outstrips the speeding up of memory access. The von Neumann bottleneck continues to worsen. Algorithmic, software, and hardware co-design to address such issues are of interest, particularly those that are achievable only with revolutionary changes in current practice.

Thursday, July 17:
Early binding, encapsulation, abstraction, and other techniques can either help or hurt performance. Consideration of techniques in compositional and related programming that help manage memory hierarchy, support portability, and help schedule computation are sought. Combination of imperative, object-oriented, and applicative programming techniques are of interest, particularly those that simultaneously address computation and communication hierarchy.

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Last Change: 16 January 1997/ george@erc.msstate.edu